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Spanish legacies : the coming of age of the second generation / Alejandro Portes, Rosa Aparicio, and William Haller

By: Portes, Alejandro 1944-.
Contributor(s): Aparicio, Rosa [aut.] | Haller, William [aut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Oakland, California : University of California Press, [2016]Description: xxiv, 264 p. : il. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780520286306.Subject(s): Fills d'immigrants -- Espanya | Espanya -- Emigració i immigració -- Aspectes socialsMateria (POPIN): MIGRANTES DE SEGUNDA GENERACIÓN | SEGUNDA GENERACIÓN DE INMIGRADOS | MIGRACIÓN | ESPAÑAMatèria (POPIN): MIGRANTS DE SEGONA GENERACIÓ | SEGONA GENERACIÓ D'IMMIGRATS | MIGRACIÓ | ESPANYASubject (POPIN): SECOND-GENERATION MIGRANTS | SECOND GENERATION IMMIGRANTS | MIGRATION | SPAINCDU: 305.23 (46) | 314.74 (02) Summary: Much like the United States, the countries of Western Europe have experienced massive immigration in the last three decades. Spain, in particular, has been transformed from an immigrant-exporting country to one receiving hundreds of thousands of new immigrants. Today, almost 13 percent of the country's population is foreign-born. Spanish Legacies, written by internationally known experts on immigration, explores how the children of immigrants-the second generation-are coping with the challenges of adaptation to Spanish society, comparing their experiences with those of their peers in the United States. Using a rich data set based on both survey and ethnographic material, Spanish Legacies describes the experiences of growing up by the large population of second-generation youths in Spain and the principal outcomes of the process-from national self-identification and experiences of discrimination to educational attainment and labor-market entry. The study is based on a sample of almost 7,000 second-generation students who were interviewed in Madrid and Barcelona in 2008 and then followed and re-interviewed four years later. A survey of immigrant parents, a replacement sample for lost respondents in the second survey, and a survey of native-parentage students complement this rich data set. Outcomes of the adaptation process in Spain are systematically presented in five chapters, introduced by real-life histories of selected respondents drawn by the study's ethnographic module. Systematic comparisons with results from the United States show a number of surprising similarities in the adaptation of children of immigrants in both countries, as well as differences marked by contrasting experiences of discrimination, self-identities, and ambition.
List(s) this item appears in: Sant Jordi 2018
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Migració(7)-POR (Browse shelf) Available Localització: Prestatgeria Migracions-USA

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Much like the United States, the countries of Western Europe have experienced massive immigration in the last three decades. Spain, in particular, has been transformed from an immigrant-exporting country to one receiving hundreds of thousands of new immigrants. Today, almost 13 percent of the country's population is foreign-born. Spanish Legacies, written by internationally known experts on immigration, explores how the children of immigrants-the second generation-are coping with the challenges of adaptation to Spanish society, comparing their experiences with those of their peers in the United States. Using a rich data set based on both survey and ethnographic material, Spanish Legacies describes the experiences of growing up by the large population of second-generation youths in Spain and the principal outcomes of the process-from national self-identification and experiences of discrimination to educational attainment and labor-market entry. The study is based on a sample of almost 7,000 second-generation students who were interviewed in Madrid and Barcelona in 2008 and then followed and re-interviewed four years later. A survey of immigrant parents, a replacement sample for lost respondents in the second survey, and a survey of native-parentage students complement this rich data set. Outcomes of the adaptation process in Spain are systematically presented in five chapters, introduced by real-life histories of selected respondents drawn by the study's ethnographic module. Systematic comparisons with results from the United States show a number of surprising similarities in the adaptation of children of immigrants in both countries, as well as differences marked by contrasting experiences of discrimination, self-identities, and ambition.

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